Bree Arabic

Bree Arabic delivers a spirited look and feel for branding and headline usage, while retaining a welcoming tone in paragraph text. Since Bree Latin is clearly influenced by handwriting, its Arabic counterpart is based on Ruq’ah, the informal handwriting style used for Arabic.

Bree Latin
  • 2008 Tipos Latinos exhibition
  • Appeared on several 2008 “Best Of” Lists
  • 2009 Bronze Award, European Design Festival
Bree Multiscript
  • Special mention at 2019 GRANSHAN competition

طريقة عمل بقلاوة بالفستق الحلبي

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البقلاوة أو (baklava) باللغة التركية هي حلوى مشهورة جداً تتكون من طبقات من رقائق عجينة الفيلو (الجلاش)، وتشتهر كثيراً في معظم مطابخ العالم ولها شهرة واسعة عالمياً.

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يرجع بعض المؤرخين جذور البقلاوة الى ما قبل الدولة العثمانية وحتى الى ما قبل الميلاد الى بلاد الرافدين والآشوريين (Mesopotamians and Assyrians)، حيث أنهم كانوا يصنعون حلوى شبيهة جداً بالبقلاوة الموجودة في عصرنا وكانت تحشى بالفواكه المجففة والمكسرات وتغطى بالعسل، وانتقلت الى الأتراك فيما بعد وتفنن طهاة السلاطين في تحضيرها ثم انتقلت الى البلاد التي خضعت للسيطرة العثمانية ويقال أنها سميت بقلاوة نسبةً الى زوجة أحد السلاطين وفي رواية أخرى نسبةً الى طاهية ماهرة اسمها لاوة (Lawa) كانت تعمل لدى السلطان عبد الحميد، ويشار الى أنّ سكان بلاد الشام وخاصة سوريا ولبنان قاموا بتحسينها والتفنن في تقديمها. أما في اليونان أضافوا لها القرفة والقرنفل  توابل أخرى.

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Some historians trace the roots of baklava back to before the Ottoman Empire and even before BC to Mesopotamians and Assyrians, as they were making a dessert very similar to contemporary baklava. It was stuffed with dried fruits and nuts and covered with honey. Later turkish sultans adapted it and it spread to the countries that came under Ottoman control. The name baklava is said to refer to a wife of a Turkish sultan. The other story claims a skilled cook named Lawa who was working for Sultan Abdul Hamid named the sweet

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The Backstory

Bree Arabic

A spirited and rhythmic handwriting style, ideal for display use and friendly paragraphs.

The Bree Arabic font family is Azza Alameddine’s spry companion to the original Bree design by Veronika Burian and José Scaglione. The Arabic script delivers a spirited look and feel for branding and headline usage, while retaining a welcoming tone in paragraph text.

Since Bree Latin is clearly influenced by handwriting, its Arabic counterpart is based on Ruq’ah, the informal handwriting style used for Arabic. Not only does this complement the other established scripts, it gives text a lively and approachable appearance in paragraphs with fluid shapes and measured flourishes. Bree Arabic combines self-assuredness with joviality, and glyph alternates are available when a slight change in tone is desired. All this adds up to a big personality, so even when set in small text there is no skimming past the words Bree voices.
 
In 2019, the Bree font family got a huge update. A few shapes were updated or added (the ‘k’ and German capital ‘ß’), two entirely new weights were added (Book and Book Italic), and spacing was perfected. More than that, Vietnamese support was added to Bree Latin, and the Bree Greek and Bree Cyrillic scripts were designed from scratch to parallel the Latin’s tone. Arabic and Thai scripts were added in 2021, along with Pinyin and refined Vietnamese diacritics being added to the Latin, and Devanagari is currently under development. Additionally, Bree was designed in the variable font format for those who want complete control over the font’s appearance while simultaneously saving digital weight in the form of megabytes. This puts Bree in the perfect position for the next digital revolution.
 
The complete seven weight Bree Thai font family, along with our entire catalogue, has been optimised for today’s varied screen uses. Bree has been chosen for such wide-ranging uses as the branding for the country of Peru, Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the US, organic food brands, and numerous layouts including mobile apps, newspapers, online magazines, and books. Be sure to check out the other scripts in the full multiscript Bree family: Arabic, Latin (including Pinyin and Vietnamese), Cyrillic, and Greek.

CREDITS
Lead design and concept
Azza Alameddine (Arabic)
Veronika Burian (Latin)
José Scaglione (Latin)

Asssistant type design
Najla Badran
Rabab Charafeddine

Engineering
Joancarles Casasin
Azza Alameddine

Quality assurance
Azza Alameddine

Consultancy Vietnamese
Donny Trương

Graphic design
Elena Veguillas
Rabab Charafeddine

Motion Design
Cecilia Brarda

Copywriting
Joshua Farmer