Jockey

Designed by José Scaglione Veronika Burian. Released 2012.

Jockey is based on the lettering by an unknown Argentine artist who designed posters for horse race tracks in the 1930s.

RIFLE EMOJI BLOCKED

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New emojis including chopsticks and curling stones will be released in latest version of Unicode, but one dropped off the list.

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At least eight new emoji will be arriving in 2017, including chopsticks, curling stones and dumplings, but one that won't be coming to smartphones any time soon is the rifle emoji. The gun had been proposed as part of a set of new icons representing winter sports (as was the curling stone emoji and a sled emoji, both of which have been approved). Rifles are used in the biathlon, which combines cross-country skiing and shooting at a target.

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The proposals were due to be part of Unicode 9, the latest version of the text-handling standard which, among its responsibilities, ensures that emoji work on devices from various manufacturers. But instead, the rifle emoji, as well as the emoji for the summer sport of Modern Pentathlon (which involves pistol shooting), was unceremoniously dropped from plans at the last minute, according to Emojipedia.

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The Backstory

Jockey

Early 1900s homage to sans serif poster text: blunted, simple, and constructed shapes.

Google comissioned the design of a new type family for its webfonts project. Jockey is based on the lettering by an unknown Argentine artist who designed posters for horse race tracks in the 1930s.
From just a few available uppercase letterforms, the TypeTogether team developed a full typeface that is now available for free at Google Webfonts.

About Us

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